Do Not Use Wood For Signs – Protect Your Investment

Signage is an investment. Your sign represents your image, and you need to consider the long-term affects of how you look.

Traditionally, signs were made from wood, or a wood by-product. Such examples include:

  • Redwood – tradition material used in sandblasting wooden signs. For decades, old-growth redwood hasn’t been allowed to be harvested.
  • Cedar – the alternative to old-growth redwood. Clear-grade heart (center of the tree) cedar gives a lesser grain pattern to old-growth redwood.
  • Soft-Wood – Pine, poplar, balsa, etc. are easy to sandblast but do not give the grain pattern relief for dimensional effects, and are not materials that last outdoors.
Wood Signs Will Have Issues - warping, cupping, splintering, mildew, etc.

Wood Signs Will Have Issues – warping, cupping, splintering, mildew, etc.

It’s common sense – wood is a product of nature and has no predictable longevity. When considering different areas have different climates that effect the expansion and contraction of natural wood, why would you want wood as the material for your expensive sign? Ask yourself – how often does the exterior of a wood faced house last before requiring repainting?

It is misleading to tell people that there is ANY commercial grade primer and top-coat finish, in any paint industry from local paint franchises to commercial grade sign enamels, that will prevent or protect wood from deteriorating from expansion and contraction. It’s simply a matter of time before it fails.

A CNC v-groove routed wood sign with the finish failing.

A CNC v-groove routed wood sign with the finish quickly failing.

While you may receive a wood sign that is primed and painted, keep in mind that the finishing system is compromised when you screw through it to mount to posts or your facade, thereby exposing the material to the elements.

There are other products that sign shops offer to reduce the wood failure. While these are cost-effective for the sign producer, they still fail. MDO (marine grade plywood) is a common wood product offered in commercial franchise sign shops. MDO is basically plywood. MDO does offer structural strength of cross-grain laminate layers like typical plywood, but instead of wood glue, MDO uses a fiberglass-style resin. Again, this wood product will fail in a matter of a few years.

Another wood substitute is High Density Urethane, or HDU. HDU is a synthetic wood product and is available in different densities and thicknesses. A typical HDU application is on a front entrance monument in brick masonry at 1.5″ thick and 15 pound (per cubic foot) density. HDU can be CNC routed or sandblasted in a variety of dimensional effects. HDU does not expand or contract, so the primer and top-coat finishes will typically last longer. HDU is a great product solution for exterior commercial grade signage. There is however an issue… HDU being a synthetic material has no natural grain structure for strength but rather is an open-cell foam product. This means it’s easy to break. A 2″ thick HDU sign between posts can be snapped in half easily.

Broken High Density Urethane (HDU) Sign

Broken High Density Urethane (HDU) Sign cracked and faded after short-term use.

The solution for signage substrate is a combination of more current technologies and finishes. Our Best Sign Monuments are made to order, not stock sheets of material pulled off a shelf. This means if you want a sign that will last the test of time, our product can be made (for example) to mount between posts at any thickness required. We can easily produce an 8″ thick sign on 12″ diameter posts that will not expand, contract, or snap on impact. Or better yet, for stand-alone solutions, a sign monument as an architectural form:

Solid Sign Monument Solutions

Solid Sign Solutions – Architectural Monument Forms that impress and last.

Fior more information on how our product is made, visit the how they are made section of our web site. To request a free quote on your next sign project, complete our online contact form with as many details as you can provide. Be sure to include a picture of the intended sign location, or even a rough sketch of what you have in mind with your quote request.

Our experienced sales team and award winning designers will be certain to come up with a cost effective solution that will impress, and protect your long-term investment.

A Cost-Effective Solution To Sandblasted Signs

Traditional sandblasted signs are beautiful, but expensive in the long run.

Sandblasted signs used to be made of old-growth redwood because the 100+ year old wood had a beautiful spaced grain pattern that blasted well, leaving a contrast between the wood grain texture and the raised graphics. They stopped the harvesting of old-growth redwood a few decades ago, which lead sign manufacturers to come up with an alternative solution, one of which was cedar. The more recent was HDU (High Density Urethane).

• Cedar – while similar in color as redwood, the grain pattern is tighter and doesn’t blast as well. Cedar is harvested young, and the seasonal expansion and contraction damages the finish. Regardless of what you are told, there is no commercial primer or topcoat finish that can withstand wood expanding or contracting. This means that just like the exterior of a wood house, a wooden sandblasted sign will have to be repaired and refinished every few years.

• HDU (High Density Urethane) – this is a synthetic wood material that does not expand or contract, meaning the primer and top surface coats will stay intact for the longevity of the paint manufacturer’s specifications. HDU is an open-cell foam, without grain for structural support. HDU does last, and a faux wood grain pattern can be blasted into it, but there is a structural issue. You can walk up to a HDU sandblasted sign and snap it in two pieces (on post application).

There are other factors to take into consideration. Let’s say your sign is 25 feet off the street and traffic is going by at 30 mph, or if you sign is located above your entry door on the facade.

• Do you think viewers will see the dimensional effects of the sandblasting?

• Is it worth the added expense for the sandblasted relief?

Our experience in the field is that it is not worth the added costs of dimensional relief by sandblasting when looking at ROI (Return On Investment) when taking into consideration the maintenance costs and lack of distance visibility.

As with any technology, times change. We offer the ability to computer graphic design a sandblasted sign “look” that can be directly applied to a lifetime, maintenance-free product (such as sheet aluminum). It looks like a sandblasted sign with dimensional effects, but at half the cost.

This is an example of a church that had a dilapidated sign that needed replacing. Here are the before and after pictures:

Saint Gabriel's Church dilapidated sign that needs replacing.

Saint Gabriel’s Church dilapidated sign that needs replacing.

Saint Gabriel's Church aluminum sign panel to look like sandblasted sign, with changeable service hours and pastor name.

Saint Gabriel’s Church aluminum sign panel to look like sandblasted sign, with changeable service hours and pastor name.

As you can see, a little painting and minimal costs on new graphics makes this church look like new.

Contact our sales team with photography of your project and let us make a recommendation.

Commercial Sign Monument with Full-Color LED Panels

Orthodontist owned multi-tenant sign monument with full-color P-10 electronic LED panels.

Orthodontist owned multi-tenant sign monument with full-color P-10 electronic LED panels.

Commercial signage is going digital. Electronic LED panels allow the ability to change graphics as demand is needed. A multi-tenant property owner can change a new slot on the fly. Animation grabs attention of drive-by traffic. Promotional programs can be displayed easily and as frequently as wanted.

Getting a full-color electronic LED is a project in itself.

The first issue is getting the LED display approved in the community through the Sign Permit process. The way to battle this issue is to fully understand the problem. Our team speaks all current LED technology. Our staff includes technicians who have personally built electronic LED panels, repaired all major LED manufacturer damaged displays, and retro-fitted new displays with current technology. We offer our knowledge in approaching City Municipalities (and County Properties) with a game plan that satisfies all needs. In many cases, we have been able to get the Municipalities to update their own Ordinances.

The next issue is costs. Yes, electronic LED displays are expensive. It’s basically an outdoor television with a built-in computer, controlled by another computer. The ROI (return on investment) is a no-brainer once you consider the immediate payback on increase in sales and recognition in the community. The ability to promote and/or change information is a bonus that pays back immediately.

This project was for a commercial facility with multiple tenants. It was a County property (more difficult than City ordinance in most situations). We walked the entire project through Permit approval with a dozen Variance applications, which took nearly a year.

Keep in mind that our modular sign monuments are the Best because they ship directly to the job site. These electronic LED panels literally screwed to an integrated support frame in the stucco sign monument. The cost savings in our stucco sign monument, which perfectly matched the architecture and stucco color of the building, deducted from the costs had the client paid a local contractor (architect, masonry contractor, installer, etc.) took a HUGE chunk out of the LED costs. We are high-volume and represent numerous LED manufacturers, so there is savings there as well.

Here are pictures of the unit after delivered to the job site. The LED panels are a P-10 (Pitch 10mm between pixels – 1R1G1B):

Stucco sign monument being lifted in the air during installation.

Stucco sign monument being lifted in the air during installation.

This is a picture of a bright white smile the Doctors wanted on their new full-color LED display:

Bright White Smile picture on P-10 Full-Color LED Panels

Bright White Smile picture on P-10 Full-Color LED Panels

And this is the picture of on the full-color P-10 LED displays after installation and electrical connection:

Orthodontist P-10 Full-Color LED Panels on Stucco Sign Monument.

Orthodontist P-10 Full-Color LED Panels on Stucco Sign Monument.

Break Away Faux Stone Sign Monuments for Beehive

Beehive is a national assisted living franchise with numerous locations. The entrances to these facilities typically have real brick and mortar block stone monument column marquees with suspended embossed sign panels under wooden post arms that welcoming incoming traffic.

There is an ongoing issue with sign monuments and liability for businesses (and all other entrance-style sign monuments including city municipalities). The monument owner may be liable for driver injury and vehicle damages incurred by vehicle impact, especially in fatal incidents. So if an elderly driver hits your sign and is injured – the facility owner may be liable.

There is a simple solution to this situation which is referred to as a “break away” style sign monument. This means on impact, the monument itself will literally break off the ground and move out of the way, causing minimal vehicle damage and preventing fatal injury.

All of our sign monuments are a break away solution, and in our company history there have yet to be any injuries on impact.

Beehive Homes franchise owners wanted to update their existing entrance marquee signs to a break away style solution, which we easily matched in our faux masonry (foam core base). Here is a picture of the original block stone (real masonry) column-style monument:

Beehive Block Stone Sign Column Monument

Beehive Block Stone Sign Column Monument

And here is our break away style sign monument column in faux masonry before it left our shipping docks:

Beehive Break Away Faux Block Stone Sign Column Monument

Beehive Break Away Faux Block Stone Sign Column Monument

As you can see the faux masonry is a fantastic match to the real stone and mortar. We attached the embossed sign panels we fabricated in a permanent method (versus hanging from chain) to prevent theft or wind damage.

 

Wentzville Missouri Sign Monuments

The City of Wentzville, Missouri has numerous highway entrances. These entrances typically had real brick and mortar block stone monument marquees with cast aluminum oval plaques welcoming incoming traffic.

There is an ongoing issue with sign monuments and liability for city municipalities (and all other entrance-style sign monuments). The monument owner may be liable for driver injury and vehicle damages incurred by vehicle impact, especially in fatal incidents. So a drunk driver hits your sign and is injured – you may be liable.

There is a simple solution to this situation which is referred to as a “break away” style sign monument. This means on impact, the monument itself will literally break off the ground and move out of the way, causing minimal vehicle damage and preventing fatal injury.

All of our sign monuments are a break away solution, and in our company history there have yet to be any injuries on impact.

The City of Wentzville wanted to update their existing City entrance marquee signs to a break away style solution, which we easily matched in our faux masonry (foam core base). Here is a picture of the original block stone (real masonry) monument:

Wentzville, MO real masonry City entrance sign monument

Wentzville, MO real masonry City entrance sign monument

And here is our break away sign monument solution before it shipped from our docks:

Wentzville, MO break away Cirty entrance sign monument

Wentzville, MO break away Cirty entrance sign monument

As you can see we are a perfect match in faux masonry and signage style. Please note the City shipped us the cast aluminum plaques to attach to our product before shipping to the job sites. This ensured a more perfect overall match as we do not cast aluminum.

Sign Monument Re-Vamp – Primrose Schools

We are often asked to update an existing sign. To save costs, our sign design team uses as much of the existing structure that is in place, repairing any damaged areas as needed.

This example shows the “before” of a brick & mortar sign monument with recessed concrete area for lettering, and the “after” where we made a specifically sized insert panel to fill the area and cover the damage. We added a 3-D embossed “coin” with the logo up top to modernize the overall appearance.

Primrose Schools Sign Monument Before

Primrose Schools Sign Monument Before

Primrose Schools Sign Monument After

Primrose Schools Sign Monument After

Sign Research Foundation – The Economic Value of On-Premise Signage

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

In 1997, the University of San Diego released a landmark study for the sign industry. It was the first time statistical analysis was used to determine the economic impact of on-premise signage to

a business. The research used data from three case studies—a large fast food chain, a national home décor retailer and auto dealers in a metropolitan city—and the results are still widely quoted today.

In 2012, the University of Cincinnati’s Economics Center deepened the examination. Leaning heavily on the original work, the University of Cincinnati’s updates included numerous additional case studies: a national lodging chain, a national banking business, a specialty store small business and a car dealership.
Both reports are called “The Economic Value of On-Premise Signage.” They show how signs act as “silent salespersons”—branding businesses, providing information about products and services, and pointing customers to exact locations. In short, an on-premise sign’s economic impact on businesses—directly and indirectly—is significant.

Researchers tackled the topic by exploring how changes in on-premise signage affect business performance. Also part of the studies was the impact on consumers and the surrounding community.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

1. SIGNS POSITIVELY IMPACT CONSUMERS AND COMMUNITIES BY MAKING IT EASIER FOR SHOPPERS TO OBTAIN THE INFORMATION THEY NEED TO MAKE A PURCHASE.

■ Sign visibility and conspicuity are especially important. In the case study of eight San Diego auto dealers, for example, 68 percent of people surveyed said that the sign had been an important factor in finding the dealer’s location. In addition, 18 percent reported being aware of the service department because of the dealer’s sign. And when one of the dealers was forced to move a sign to comply with a new code, 21 percent of that dealer’s customer base reported that the business was hard to locate without the sign.

■ Researchers determined that the addition of one sign at every fast-food outlet in Los Angeles would raise business revenues by $132 million; those businesses would in turn pay an additional $10 million in sales tax revenue to the local municipality.

American consumers who have driven by a desired business without finding it due to insufficient signage

American consumers who have driven by a desired business without finding it due to insufficient signage

2. CHANGES TO SIGNS DI2RECTLY IMPACT BUSINESS PERFORMANCE.

■ The studies proved that changes such as adding signs or replacing outdated or inoperable signs had positive effects on sales, number of transactions and profits. Roughly 60 percent of businesses studied reported average sales increases of 10 percent.

■ Just one additional sign yielded sales increases of 4.75 percent, an impact greater than that brought on by a larger building, longer hours of operation or location longevity.

■ Lower-performing stores benefitted the most from changes to signage, such as the addition of a sign to a building that previously didn’t have one.

■ Updates and improvements to existing signs led to a 5 percent weekly sales increase for many stores; underperforming stores saw weekly sales increase by 15 percent.

3. POSITIVE BUSINESS PERFORMANCE IS ASSOCIATED WITH EFFECTIVE SIGN DESIGN, PLACEMENT, AND DIVERSITY OF MEDIA.

■ In the 2012 study, the car dealership found that adding a digital sign board increased not only service department revenue and customer traffic; it also created goodwill as a place for community-related public service messages.

■ A key aspect of effective signage is proper regulation. Ideally, sign regulations balance community design objectives with full knowledge of how sign design and location impact business success. When sign codes are overly restrictive, businesses can be directly affected—as can consumers who have trouble finding those businesses due to inadequate/ineffective signage.

WHAT’S A SIGN WORTH?

North American shoppers who associate sign quality with store and product quality

North American shoppers who associate sign quality with store and product quality.

North American shoppers who make store choices based on the information communicated by store signs

North American shoppers who make store choices based on the information communicated by store signs.

Increase in weekly sales for one business that combined a major building sign modification with two additional minor changes

Increase in weekly sales for one business that combined a major building sign modification with two additional minor changes.

Researchers

University of San Diego (1997): Seth R. Ellis, Ph.D. Robert Johnson, Ph.D. Robin Murphy, M.B.A.

University of Cincinnati (2012): Jeff Rexhausen, Principal Investigator Henry Hildebrandt, Co-Investigator Christopher Auffrey, Ph.D., Co-Investigator

Arts & Science of Sign Design – Signage Foundation, Inc.

Arts & Science of Sign Design

signage foundation, inc. article

To be an effective form of communication, signs must incorporate sciences behind artistic design principles. Any regulation must also take these factors into consideration to ensure that signs are both effective and safe. This document includes some of the latest research into applicable scientific principles.

About The Signage Foundation, Inc.

The Signage Foundation, Inc., is a not-for-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to fulfilling the educational, research, and philanthropic purposes of on-premise signage. SFI was established in 2002 as a 501(c) (3) public foundation through its supporting organizational alignment with the International Sign Association. The Foundation is governed by a board of directors representing the diversity and professional depth within the large community of individuals that believe in the social and economic value of on-premise signage.

The Signage Foundation, Inc. affirms signage as a fundamental component of today’s communication system and as a necessity for the development of a visually pleasing, economically healthy, and diverse community. The Signage Foundation promotes intelligent and productive use of on-premise signage and storefronts that benefits every sector of the U.S. economy.

The Signage Foundation, Inc., is committed to expanding the knowledge base on the use and benefits of signage products through peer-reviewed research to facilitate the operation within the marketplace by manufacturers, suppliers, and individuals in their efforts to design, build, and sell innovative products. Each fall, The Signage Foundation hosts the National Signage Research and Education Conference in conjunction with the University of Cincinnati’s Colleges of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning, and Business.

While SFI commissions original research and publishes the results as original treatises, in the interest of promoting signage information to a broader audience, it also condenses and republishes (with permission) existing articles and studies.

Arts and Science

The following article has been adapted and updated from a version that originally appeared in the 1997 “Economic Value of On-Premise Signage,” published by the California Sign Association (formerly the California Electric Sign Association) and the International Sign Association.

Overview

In just a few words, signs convey a lot. They draw attention, communicate a message, compete with surroundings, and reach a driver whizzing by.

But signs are more than an artistic endeavor. The best blend strong design and graphics with a thorough understanding of the science that makes them most effective.

Sign regulations, too, must balance artistic expression with scientific research. Otherwise, the end result could be harm to a business or, worse yet, an unsafe distraction for drivers.

The Federal Highway Administration has developed numerous principles to ensure road signs are safe. While the FHWA’s information is aimed at highway signs, the agency includes research that can apply to on-premise signage as well. For instance, the FWHA has determined that 41 percent of accidents occur because of a lack of adequate signage. Further studies have established that the most important consideration in determining the size and placement of a sign is the distance between the sign and the viewer.

Consequently, one blanket sign ordinance is rarely enough to meet the diverse needs based on viewership or location.

Location

A sign will not be viewed by any driver on its own. It will be seen in the context of other structures, landscaping, and visual sight lines in the area. Because of its very nature, on-premise signage is located further away from the roadway than traffic signs. It sits on the property of the sign owner, beyond the lanes of traffic and right-of-way. Signs must be high enough to be seen beyond obstructions, such as cars parked alongside the street and on the roadway.

If a sign is visible from a greater distance, it affords a longer viewing time and is better able to develop an impression. At 55 mph, the viewer travels 80 feet per second. It takes 16.5 seconds to travel a quarter mile. There is little time to draw attention from the road and redirect it to the sign.

If the sign is to be seen by drivers, the speed at which they are traveling is also a factor. Drivers must have time to read the sign, process the information, and safely react. This is called the Decision Sign Distance (DSD) and varies depending upon the rate of speed on the street. A driver must have adequate time to react to the sign, decide to take action, and then safely complete the maneuver. If there are a number of signs in the area, drivers may need additional time to respond.

Sign Design

To be most effective, the sign’s design must accommodate the location as well. The size of its letters will be affected by how far the sign is from the viewer. It also will vary according to the intended viewer: a pedestrian or a driver.

But other elements can influence the sign reader’s ability to comprehend. Signs that feature familiar logos, words, and fonts can be processed more quickly. Because of familiarity, for instance, the current McDonald’s sign features only its name and the iconic golden arches. Nowhere on the modern version of the sign does it say “hamburger” or “restaurant,” as it once did. Familiarity allows viewers to fill in those blanks because they know the name and the logo.

Color: Color is recognized as part of a corporate logo. Studies have shown that 80 percent of the recognition of a trademark is due to its color. Whether it is an iconic, international brand or a small local store, viewers will recognize the sign in part because of the colors used on it.

Luminance: Color bears another important aspect of sign design. Each color reflects a specific percentage of light striking its surface. This is known as luminance. The chart below shows how various colors rank on the luminance scale. When signs are internally illuminated, those that have a higher luminance scale show brighter.

Percentage of Light Reflected by Colors

Percentage of Light Reflected by Colors

Light emitted from a light source, such as neon or LEDs, also has varying degrees of brightness. They are, in order, dimmest to brightest: red, blue, green, and yellow. This is known as luminescence.

For drivers traveling at night, both the reflected light—luminance—and illuminated light— luminescence—factor into the readability of the sign.

Contrast: Most signs include words and objects that are a different color than the background. The contrast between these two items also affects the readability of the sign. This occurs at two points: the exterior and interior of the sign. Exterior contrast compares the sign’s edge to the background against which it must be viewed. This might be how the sign’s design fits into a multi-tenant sign, or how the sign’s edge meets the building to which it is affixed.

The same requirements apply to the interior of the sign—where the copy meets the background. White letters on a yellow background will not be nearly as striking as white on black, for instance.

In the publication Visual Communication Through Signage, authors Karen Claus and James Claus ranked the following color combinations, from most to least readable:

Text Colors On Colored Backgrounds

Text Colors On Colored Backgrounds

Size: The larger the letters appear, the better. The copy of the Snellen eye chart (right) certainly illustrates the relationship between the physical size and the dramatic visual impact. When a sign must be read easily in a minimum amount of time—such as when traffic passes by at a high rate of speed—it is important that the words be large.

To be readable—and to convey its message safely—a sign must be detectable, conspicuous, legible, and comprehensible. A sign reportedly should be 40 feet of distance per inch of letter height, which allows for maximum comprehension and legibility day and night.

Lettering on signs should include strokes— measuring the thickness of the letters—that are one-fifth the letter height for maximum readability.

Text Size Chart

Text Size Chart

The Viewer

Signs intend to communicate with a viewer, of course. But sometimes, viewer limitations get in the way.

It has been well documented that the American population is aging. In 2011, 13 percent of the U.S. population was over age 65 and by 2025, about one in four drivers is expected to be over 65. Eyesight declines with age, and reaction time slows.

It is estimated that 66 percent of American adults wear glasses, contact lenses, or both. As many as 3 million people have glaucoma, and cataracts affect 22 million people over age 40. Most of us see more poorly in low-light conditions. To compensate, signs must be designed to provide better visibility, especially at night.

No matter the age, though, all drivers have a relatively narrow cone of vision. Signs must be positioned within this cone so that the driver doesn’t need to take his eyes off the roadway to take in the sign.

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices—the federal government’s standards for signs and signals along America’s roadways—sets a maximum height for traffic signals. It is based on the concept that viewers sitting at an intersection can see about 20 degrees from the driver’s eye height. Anything else could be lost in the upper portion of the windshield. While these standards apply only to signals and road signs, the science applies to on-premise signage as well. If the sign isn’t positioned correctly—or its orientation to the roadway is increased dramatically—it may be illegible if the sign isn’t large enough. But for signs to be the clearest, the cone is somewhat more narrow. The absolute clearest viewpoint is a cone of about 3 degrees around where the eyes are focused. Readability is severely limited outside a 10- degree cone.

Appendix

References

  1. Bagni, R.A., OAAA Guidelines & Standards, 1993
  2. Hardwick, Walter G., Visual Communications and Urban Design, 1994
  3. Howett, G.L. Size of Letters Required for Visibility as a Function of Viewing Distance and Observer Visual Acuity, National Bureau of Standards, 1983
  4. Huff, Richelle J., “Corporate Identity Via Signage,” California Sign Association seminar, 1994
  5. Jones, David K., Sign Regulation and the Mechanics of Visual Communication, 1994
  6. Kline, Kline, Fozard, Journals of Gerontology, Visions in Vehicles, 1992
  7. Mace, D.J., Sign Legibility & Conspicuity, 1988
  8. Schwab, Richard N., Visibility of Highway Signing, 1994
  9. Jourdan, Hawkins, Abrams, and Winson-Geideman, A Legal and Technical Exploration of On-Premise Sign Regulation: An Evidence Based-Model Sign Code, 2009.

10. Weinstein, Hartt, A Framework for On-Premise Sign Regulations, 2009.

To Learn More

The Signage Foundation, Inc., has developed document that incorporates all of these factors. To receive a copy of A Framework for On-Premise Sign Regulations, visit www.thesignagefoundation.org.

Other publications that may be of interest:

  • “Economic Value of On-Premise Signage,” 1997
  • “Economic Value of On-Premise Signage,” 2012

©Signage Foundation Inc. 2012

LED Strand Lights – Add to Any Sign!

We carry LED strand lights for updating and electrifying your existing outdoor sign. We can also integrate these LED lights into your new sign project. These LED strand lights are commercial grade, outdoor weatherproof, and self-adhesive.

LED Strand Lights

LED Strand Lights

There are multiple advantages to using these LED strand lights, the most important being they are extremely bright (twice the brightness of fluorescent lights) yet only use half the energy of traditional lighting. Each (100) module string of LEDs (3 bulbs per module as shown) only requires (1) power ballast to convert standard 110v power source down to the 12 volts they need to run. This mean in a short time, LED strand lights will pay for themselves in energy savings on your power bill.

This is an example of a commercial business sign with dimensional letters. This customer bought (4) LED light strand kits, and used the self-adhesive modules to the backs of each character. They put the power supplies inside the monument (which was hollow). Here is a picture of the sign during the day time:

Commercial Business Sign with LED Strand Lights - Day Time View

Commercial Business Sign with LED Strand Lights – Day Time View

And here is the same sign at night with the new LED strand lights:

Commercial Business Sign with LED Strand Lights - Night Time View

Commercial Business Sign with LED Strand Lights – Night Time View

As you can see, they are so bright it was difficult for the camera to take the picture clearly! These are visible a half mile up the street in both directions. A minimal investment with maximum results – not bad!

LED Signs – Electronic Message Boards

P-10 Full-Color LED Message Boards

P-10 Full-Color LED Message Boards

We now offer electronic message boards. LED (light emitting diode) technology is a low-voltage, very bright light away to advertise.

Our LED cabinets are for both indoor and (most common) outdoor use. The steel cabinets are water tight and weather proof with a power coat finish. They have built in ventilation systems with front-access to all internal components.

The overall screen is broken up into individual LED modules that are changeable (in the odd case of damage).

Our LEDs are plug and play, meaning you connect to a 120 volt power source (electrical outlet) and are ready to program. We include a brand new laptop, pre=programmed with LED controller software. We also offer complementary initial training and 24-7 tech support. We install remote control software (TeamViewer) for the laptop so a technician can log in and train you, and test/repair and issues from headquarters.

Our LED cabinets are easy maintenance. They self-cool, so you only need to keep the displays free of debris. We offer integrated data connections (plug in an ethernet cable directly from the computer) as well as wi-fi antennas with a range up to 1.5 miles (with clear line of site, meaning no trees or buildings in the way between antennas). Wi-fi access means you do not have to dig up your parking lot or established landscaping to control your new LED panels.

You have the ability to upload images, text in any font, and even videos!

Our LED panels have a (5) year warranty with an expected 20,000 hour lifespan.

Call us for a quote. You will find we offer the highest resolutions at the best prices, and our LEDs are made in the USA with USA tech support.

LED Cabinet Open - Internal Power Supplies and Wiring of Modules

LED Cabinet Open – Internal Power Supplies and Wiring of Modules

Industry Terms:

You should be aware of common mechanics and terms used before investing in an LED message board:

• P-10: P is for pitch, meaning the distance in millimeters between each pixel. Note: P-10 is a BETTER resolution than a P-16. Because the pixels are closer together, you get more pixels (or higher resolution) in the same size area.

• Full-Color: 1R 1G 1B – one red, one green and one blue LED crystal in a triangle to make a single pixel (industry standard). Your TV at home is in RGB as is your computer monitor.

• Power Supplies: Our power outlets are 120v, but LED pixels only require 5v to operate. This is why they are so energy efficient! All LED message centers have built-in power supplies that transform 120v to 5v, then power each of the divided LED modules in the matrix. We do not overload power supplies by making one power supply power all grids, but rather split the electrical load over multiple power supplies to make the cabinets electrically solid and sound.

Call us toll free (800) 735-7209 for questions, or use the Contact Form (right) for a quote.